Mike Johnson (cornerback)

Mike Johnson

No. 23

Position:
Cornerback

Personal information

Date of birth:
(1943-10-07) October 7, 1943 (age 73)

Place of birth:
Denver, Colorado

Height:
5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)

Weight:
184 lb (83 kg)

Career information

High school:
Garden City (KS)

College:
Kansas

AFL draft:
1966 / Round: 14 / Pick: 125

Career history

Dallas Cowboys (1966–1969)
Chicago Bears (1970)*

 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only

Career NFL statistics

Games played – started:
54 – 28

Interceptions:
8

Player stats at NFL.com

Player stats at PFR

Michael Alan Johnson (born October 7, 1943) is a former American football cornerback who played four seasons with the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League. He was drafted by the Oakland Raiders in the 14th round of the 1966 AFL draft. He played college football at the University of Kansas and attended Garden City High School in Garden City, Kansas.

Contents

1 Early years
2 Professional career
3 References
4 External links

Early years[edit]
Johnson attended Garden City High School before moving on to the University of Kansas, where he was a part of the same offensive backfield as Gale Sayers.[1] Injuries affected his production in college, including as a senior, when he was going to be the featured running back.[2]
Professional career[edit]
Johnson was drafted by the Oakland Raiders in the 1966 American Football League draft, but instead of playing for the Raiders, he chose to sign with the NFL’s Dallas Cowboys as a free agent in 1966. He was converted to a defensive back, based on how the Cowboys saw him tackle on special teams in college.[3] As a rookie, besides playing special teams, he was also used as a linebacker, when the other teams employed their two-minute offense.[4]
In 1967, he passed Warren Livingston on the depth chart for the right cornerback starting position and finished with 5 interceptions.[5] In 1969, he lost his starting job to Phil Clark.
On August 3, 1970, he was traded to the Chicago Bears in exchange for a draft choice.[6]
References[edit]

^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=2199&dat=19640826&id=HocyAAAAIBAJ&sjid=G-YFAAAAIBAJ&pg=5119,4862317
^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=2199&dat=19651111&id=Uk4xAAAAIBAJ&sjid=FeYFAAAAIBAJ&pg=7080,4439822
^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=2206&dat=19661013&id=GNYzAAAAIBAJ&sjid=X-sFAAAAIB

Kroszewo

Kroszewo

Village

Kroszewo

Coordinates: 53°44′N 22°47′E / 53.733°N 22.783°E / 53.733; 22.783

Country
 Poland

Voivodeship
Podlaskie

County
Augustów

Gmina
Bargłów Kościelny

Kroszewo [krɔˈʂɛvɔ] is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Bargłów Kościelny, within Augustów County, Podlaskie Voivodeship, in north-eastern Poland.[1] It lies approximately 5 kilometres (3 mi) south-west of Bargłów Kościelny, 18 km (11 mi) south-west of Augustów, and 73 km (45 mi) north of the regional capital Białystok.
References[edit]

^ “Central Statistical Office (GUS) – TERYT (National Register of Territorial Land Apportionment Journal)” (in Polish). 2008-06-01. 

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Gmina Bargłów Kościelny

Seat

Bargłów Kościelny

Other villages

Bargłów Dworny
Bargłówka
Barszcze
Brzozówka
Bułkowizna
Dreństwo
Górskie
Judziki
Komorniki
Kresy
Kroszewo
Kroszówka
Kukowo
Łabętnik
Lipowo
Nowa Kamionka
Nowiny Bargłowskie
Pieńki
Pomiany
Popowo
Pruska
Reszki
Rumiejki
Solistówka
Sosnowo
Stara Kamionka
Stare Nowiny
Stare Tajno
Tajenko
Tajno Łanowe
Tajno Podjeziorne
Wólka Karwowska
Źrobki

Coordinates: 53°44′00″N 22°47′00″E / 53.7333°N 22.7833°E / 53.7333; 22.7833

This Augustów County location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Temple (Latter Day Saints)

The Salt Lake Temple, operated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, is the best-known Mormon temple. Located in Salt Lake City, Utah, it is the centerpiece of the 10 acre (40,000 m2) Temple Square.

In the Latter Day Saint movement, a temple is a building dedicated to be a house of God and is reserved for special forms of worship. A temple differs from a church meetinghouse, which is used for weekly worship services.[1] Temples have been a significant part of the Latter Day Saint movement since early in its inception. Today, temples are operated by several Latter Day Saint denominations. The most prolific builder of temples of the Latter Day Saint movement is The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). There are 155 operating temples (which includes 3 previously dedicated, but closed for renovation), 12 under construction, and 10 announced (not yet under construction). Several other variations of the church have built or attempted to build temples. The Community of Christ operates two temples in the United States, which are open to the public and are used for worship services, performances, and religious education.[2] Other denominations with temples are the Apostolic United Brethren, the Church of Christ, the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints and the Righteous Branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Contents

1 History
2 Purposes
3 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

3.1 History
3.2 Construction

4 Community of Christ
5 Church of Jesus Christ (Cutlerite)
6 Other denominations with temples
7 Unsuccessful attempts at building temples
8 Performing ordinances in other buildings
9 See also
10 Notes
11 References
12 External links

History[edit]

The Kirtland Temple, owned and maintained by the Community of Christ, was the first temple of the Latter Day Saint movement and the only temple completed in the lifetime of Joseph Smith

The Nauvoo Temple: built in 1846, destroyed soon after, and rebuilt in 2002

The Latter Day Saint movement was conceived as a restoration of practices believed to have been lost in a Great Apostasy from the true gospel of Jesus Christ. Temple worship played a prominent role in the Bible’s Old Testament, and in the Book of Mormon.[3]
On December 27, 1832, two years after the organization of the Church of Christ, the church’s founder, Joseph Smith, reported receiving a revelation that called upon church members to restore the p

Shoshana Netanyahu

Shoshana Netanyahu (Hebrew: שׁוֹשַׁנָּה נְתַנְיָהוּ‎; born April 6, 1923) is an Israeli lawyer and judge, a former justice at the Supreme Court of Israel. She is a widow of mathematician Elisha Netanyahu (1912–1986), who was the uncle of Benjamin Netanyahu, current Prime Minister of Israel.
Biography[edit]
Netanyahu was born Shoshana Shenburg in 1923, in the Free City of Danzig (now Gdańsk, Poland). She immigrated to Palestine with her family in 1924, and settled in the Bat Galim neighborhood of Haifa. She graduated from the Reali High School in Haifa 1941, and took British mandate-operated legal classes.
She worked at the law firm of S. Horowitz, and then spent a year serving as assistant prosecutor in the Israel Air Force. She returned to her previous position, and two years later moved to the advocate firm, Friedman and Komisar.[1]
She married professor Elisha Netanyahu in 1949; their eldest son was born in 1951. In 1953 the family left for a sabbatical at Stanford university, where their second son was born.
In 1960 she returned to Friedman and Komisar. In 1969 she was appointed a judge on the Magistrates Court in Haifa and from 1974 to 1981 she served as a Haifa District Court judge. In 1981, she became the second female Israel Supreme Court justice, after Miriam Ben-Porat’s retirement. She retired from the Supreme Court in 1993. During her tenure, she also headed a national committee on health care in Israel from 1988 to 1990, which led to major legislative changes.
After her retirement, Netanyahu was an adjunct lecturer at the University of Haifa (1993–1998) and at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (1993–2002). In 1993, she received the Women’s League for Conservative Judaism award. She received an honorary doctorate from the University of Haifa in 1997. In 2002 she was made an honorary citizen of Jerusalem.
Netanyahu has two children: Nathan (b. 1951), a professor of computer science at Bar-Ilan University, and Dan (b. 1954), an information systems auditor.
References[edit]

^ Eliahou, Galia. “Shoshana Netanyahu”. Jewish Women: A Comprehensive Historical Encyclopedia. Jewish Women’s Archive. 

External links[edit]

Salokar, Rebecca Mae; Mary L. Volcansek (1996). Women in Law: A Bio-bibliographical Sourcebook. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 376. ISBN 0-313-29410-0. 
Martin Edelman, “The Judicial Elite of Israel”, International Political Science Review, Vol. 13, No. 3 (July 1992), pp. 235–2

Paul Wiesner

Paul Wiesner

Personal information

Nationality
Swiss

Born
(1855-10-09)9 October 1855

Died
1 October 1930(1930-10-01) (aged 74)
Berlin, Germany

Sailing career

Class(es)
1 — 2 ton

Club
Berliner Yacht-Club

Medal record

Sailing

Representing Germany

Olympic Games

1900 Paris
Open class

Disqualified
1900 Paris
0.5 to 1 ton 1st race

1900 Paris
1 to 2 ton 2nd race

Updated on 8 May 2015.

Paul Wiesner (9 October 1855 – 1 October 1930) was a German sailor who competed in the 1900 Summer Olympics.[1]
He was the helmsman of the German boat Aschenbrödel, which won the gold medal in the second race of 1 – 2 ton class and silver medal in the open class. He also participated in the ½—1 ton class, but his boat Aschenbrödel weighed in at 1.041 tons instead of less than a 1 ton, and he was disqualified.
Further reading[edit]

Exposition Universelle Internationale de 1900, Concours D’Exercices Physiques et de Sports (PDF) (in French). Imprimerie Nationale. 1901. Retrieved 2014-02-08. 

References[edit]

^ “Paul Wiesner Bio, Stats, and Results”. Olympic Sports. Retrieved 2014-02-08. 

This article about a German Olympic medalist is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Isaac Husik

Portrait of Isaac Husik.

Isaac Husik (1876–1939) (Hebrew: יצחק הוזיק) was a Jewish historian, translator, and student of philosophy, one of the first three individuals to serve as official faculty at Gratz College in Philadelphia.

Contents

1 Biography
2 Works
3 References
4 External links

Biography[edit]
Husik was born in Vasseutinez near Kiev, Russian Empire on 10 February 1876. Because of the worsening climate under the Russian imperial May Laws, in 1888, when he was 12 years old, he moved with his mother to Philadelphia. His father, the teacher Wolf Husik, rejoined them the following year. Isaac received his early instruction from his father and from Dr. Sabato Morais, rabbi at the Sephardic congregation Kahal Kadosh Mikveh Israel in Philadelphia, and one of the founders of the Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS). Husik attended JTS while preparing for secular studies, and received direct guidance from Dr. Morais, but did not ultimately pursue a rabbinical career.
Husik attended Central High School (Philadelphia), and then enrolled at University of Pennsylvania, where he received a master’s degree in Mathematics in 1899. Ultimately, however, his interests turned to the study of the classics, especially Aristotle, and he received his Ph.D. in Philosophy from University of Pennsylvania in 1903. His thesis, entitled Judah Messer Leon’s Commentary on the Vetus Logica, was published in Leyden in 1906.
While still a student at Penn, Husik accepted an Instructorship in Hebrew and Bible at Gratz College, but simultaneously remained an instructor in Philosophy at Penn. He eventually left Gratz, and was appointed full Professor of Philosophy at Penn in 1922. He taught classes also at Yeshiva College, Hebrew Union College, and Columbia University Summer School.
In 1923, Husik was appointed editor of the Jewish Publication Society of America, in which capacity he served until his death. He additionally served in a wide range of voluntary communal positions, and married Rose Gorfine late in life. He died suddenly at the age of 63. The philosopher Leo Strauss called him in his “Preface to Isaac Husik, Philosophical Essys: Ancient, Medieval, and Modern” (1952): “one of the most distinguished historians of philosophy America had produced”.
Works[edit]
Husik’s best known work is A History of Mediaeval Jewish Philosophy [1] (Jewish Publication Society, 1916, and several times thereafter), which was considered at the time to be a pioneering effort i

Vuadens

Vuadens

Coat of arms

Vuadens

Location of Vuadens 

Coordinates: 46°37′N 7°1′E / 46.617°N 7.017°E / 46.617; 7.017Coordinates: 46°37′N 7°1′E / 46.617°N 7.017°E / 46.617; 7.017

Country
Switzerland

Canton
Fribourg

District
Gruyère

Government

 • Mayor
Syndic

Area[1]

 • Total
10.44 km2 (4.03 sq mi)

Elevation
803 m (2,635 ft)

Population (Dec 2015[2])

 • Total
2,282

 • Density
220/km2 (570/sq mi)

Postal code
1628

SFOS number
2160

Surrounded by
Bulle, Echarlens, Gruyères, Riaz, Vaulruz

Website
www.vuadens.ch
SFSO statistics

Vuadens is a municipality in the district of Gruyère in the canton of Fribourg in Switzerland.

Contents

1 History
2 Geography
3 Coat of arms
4 Demographics
5 Politics
6 Economy
7 Religion
8 Education
9 References

History[edit]
Vuadens is first mentioned in 516 as curtis Wadingum. In 929 it was mentioned as Vuadingis.[3]
Geography[edit]
Vuadens has an area, as of 2009[update], of 10.4 square kilometers (4.0 sq mi). Of this area, 6.9 km2 (2.7 sq mi) or 66.1% is used for agricultural purposes, while 2.48 km2 (0.96 sq mi) or 23.8% is forested. Of the rest of the land, 1.09 km2 (0.42 sq mi) or 10.4% is settled (buildings or roads), 0.01 km2 (2.5 acres) or 0.1% is either rivers or lakes and 0.01 km2 (2.5 acres) or 0.1% is unproductive land.[4]
Of the built up area, industrial buildings made up 1.1% of the total area while housing and buildings made up 5.9% and transportation infrastructure made up 3.2%. Out of the forested land, 20.5% of the total land area is heavily forested and 3.3% is covered with orchards or small clusters of trees. Of the agricultural land, 3.4% is used for growing crops and 43.8% is pastures and 18.6% is used for alpine pastures. All the water in the municipality is flowing water.[4]
The municipality is located in the Gruyère district.
Coat of arms[edit]
The blazon of the municipal coat of arms is Gules a Cross Argent in chief dexter a Cross bottony of the same and overall a Crane rising of the same.[5]
Demographics[edit]
Vuadens has a population (as of December 2015[update]) of 2,282.[6] As of 2008[update], 11.5% of the population are resident foreign nationals.[7] Over the last 10 years (2000–2010) the population has changed at a rate of 19.7%. Migration accounte
부산오피

Yūsei Matsui

Yūsei Matsui
松井優征

Born
(1979-01-31) January 31, 1979 (age 38)
Saitama, Japan

Area(s)
Manga artist

Notable works

Neuro: Supernatural Detective, Assassination Classroom

Yūsei Matsui (松井優征, Matsui Yūsei?, born January 31, 1979 in Saitama, Japan) is a manga artist known for manga Neuro: Supernatural Detective and Assassination Classroom. He was an assistant of Yoshio Sawai, the manga artist of Bobobo-bo Bo-bobo.[citation needed] Both Neuro and Assassination Classroom have been made into anime television series. In episode 25 of the Neuro anime, he has a cameo voice as a manga artist.[episode needed]
Works[edit]

Title
Year
Notes
Refs[1]

Neuro: Supernatural Detective
2005–09
Serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump, published in 23 volumes

Assassination Classroom
2012–2016
Serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump, published in 21 volumes

Rikon Choutei (離婚調停?, lit. “Divorce Concilation”)
2009
One-shot in Weekly Shōnen Jump
[citation needed]

Tokyo Depato Sensou Taikenki
2011
One-shot
[citation needed]

References[edit]

^ “著者:松井優征” [Author: Yusei Matsui]. Media Arts Database (in Japanese). Japan: Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved March 10, 2016. 

External links[edit]

Yūsei Matsui at Anime News Network’s encyclopedia

Authority control

WorldCat Identities
VIAF: 59418622
SUDOC: 146709934
BNF: cb15784337v (data)
NDL: 01003700

This biographical article about a manga artist is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Lasiococca

Lasiococca

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Plantae

(unranked):
Angiosperms

(unranked):
Eudicots

(unranked):
Rosids

Order:
Malpighiales

Family:
Euphorbiaceae

Subfamily:
Acalyphoideae

Tribe:
Acalypheae

Subtribe:
Lasiococcinae

Genus:
Lasiococca
Hook.f.

Type species

Lasiococca symphylliifolia
(Kurz) Hook.f.

Lasiococca is a plant genus of the family Euphorbiaceae first described in 1887.[1][2] These are small to relatively large trees (up to 8 m high) found in scrubs or semi-evergreen forests. They grow in India, Indochina, Southeast Asia, and southern China.[3][4]

Species[5]

Lasiococca brevipes (Merr.) Welzen & S.E.C.Sierra (syn L. malaccensis) – Peninsular Malaysia, Philippines, Lesser Sunda Islands, Sulawesi
Lasiococca chanii Thin – Vietnam
Lasiococca comberi Haines – Hainan, Yunnan, Vietnam, Thailand, E India
Lasiococca locii Thin – Vietnam
Lasiococca symphylliifolia (Kurz) Hook.f. – Sikkim

References[edit]

^ Hooker, Joseph Dalton. 1887. Hooker’s Icones Plantarum 16: , pl. 1587 descriptions in Latin, commentary in English. Also line drawing as illustration of L. symphylliifolia
^ Tropicos
^ Govaerts, R., Frodin, D.G. & Radcliffe-Smith, A. (2000). World Checklist and Bibliography of Euphorbiaceae (and Pandaceae) 1-4: 1-1622. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
^ Flora of China Vol. 11 Page 247 轮叶戟属 lun ye ji shu Lasiococca J. D. Hooker, Hooker’s Icon. Pl. 16: t. 1587. 1887.
^ Kew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families

This Euphorbiaceae-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Candra Naya

Candra Naya

Candra Naya building below the super block Green Central City.

location within Jakarta

General information

Status
restored

Type
House

Architectural style
Chinese

Location
Jakarta, Indonesia

Address
Jalan Gajah Mada

Coordinates
6°8′50″S 106°48′55″E / 6.14722°S 106.81528°E / -6.14722; 106.81528Coordinates: 6°8′50″S 106°48′55″E / 6.14722°S 106.81528°E / -6.14722; 106.81528

Estimated completion
late 18th-century;[1] or 1807[2][3]

Design and construction

Architect
anonymous

Candra Naya (Hokkien: Sin Ming Hui) is an 18th-century historic building in Jakarta, Indonesia. It was home to the Khouw family of Tamboen, most notably its highest-ranking member: Khouw Kim An, the last Majoor der Chinezen (‘Major of the Chinese’) of Batavia (in office from 1910 until 1942).[4][5] Although among the grandest colonial residences in the capital and protected by heritage laws, the compound was almost completely demolished by its new owners, the conglomerate Modern Group.[6] The main halls have survived only thanks to vocal protests from heritage conservation groups.[6]

Contents

1 Building
2 The Khouw family of Tamboen
3 Subsequent history

3.1 Candra Naya Social Union
3.2 Dispute and demolition
3.3 Restoration

4 References
5 Cited books

Building[edit]
Candra Naya was built in 1807[2] or earlier in the late 18th-century.[1] The most notable Chinese features of the house are its traditional curving roof, its Tou-Kung roof frame and its moon gates. The compound consisted originally of three main buildings, surrounded by ancillary buildings to its north and south. The three main buildings consist of a one-floored reception hall; a two-floored, semi-private central hall for worship; and the private, two-floored rear building for the family. The main buildings were separated from each other by a series of inner courtyards. The ancillary buildings to the north and south were one-floored structures, and were used as service quarters and accommodation for children, concubines and servants. In 1995, the two-floored central buildings were demolished to make way for a superblock. Due to protests from heritage groups, demolition work was halted. As of now, the only original building is the one-floored reception hall. The other main buildings were temporarily dismantled to allow for construction of the superblock, then reassembled and restored. The rear building was never rebuilt.[7]
T